• Junco

    Releases Recovered Wildlife

  • squirrel_feeding_home2

    Provides Food & Shelter

  • Junco

    Offers Outreach & Education

  • Snowy Owl

    Rehabilitates Wildlife

  • baby_skunk_home2

    Provides Medical Treatment

Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society

The Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (CWRS) is dedicated to treating injured and orphaned wildlife, providing valuable outreach and education services to the community and engaging all volunteers in motivational work and skill building experience.

 

Annual Reports
CWRS 2016 Annual Report
CWRS 2015 Annual Report

 


Found or seen an Injured Animal or Banded Bird?

If you have found or seen a banded bird, please contact CWRS! .

Contact CWRS

Before handling a wild animal or calling the CWRS

Read Our Advice

Read our wildlife FAQs or ask us a question.

Contact CWRS

Featured News & Events

  • CWRS-PhotographyContest-Facebook-01

    Photo Contest Feb 1- 28


    Send us your best shot! CWRS is looking for your photographs of native Alberta wildlife in their natural habitats, including both wild and urban environments, that showcase the diversity and beauty of our wild neighbours! CWRS is raising funds and awareness with our first annual photography contest. Winning photographers will win gift certificates, equipment and more!
    CONTEST DETAILS
    FEE: $10 per photo submitted
    CONTEST OPENS: February 1, 2018
    SUBMISSION DEADLINE: February 28, 2018
    For complete contest rules and to enter please click here.
    www.calgarywildlife.org/photo-contest

  • Volunteer Spotlight: Henry Swain

    At Calgary Wildlife, we have many special volunteers that have been with us long enough to feel as though they are part of the social fabric of our organization. Henry Swain is one of those volunteers. Henry started volunteering with us as an intern in 2013 when he was visiting from the U.K. After graduation he moved to Calgary and has been volunteering with us since then. Henry is a quietly kind man whose unassuming competence as a volunteer is greatly appreciated by all our staff. While Henry has worked with many of our patients, we will always remember how one of our patients, a baby porcupine we called Princess Porky, seemed to have an affinity for him.
    1. What kind of work do you do?
    At the moment I have 2 part time jobs, one being downtown at the westin hotel, however I’m looking into the field of wildlife conservation in Alberta.
    2. What brought you to Calgary Wildilfe?
    I aim to use my UK Degree in Animal behaviour and wildlife conservation to work in Canada’s parks and wilderness, I also liked the feel of Calgary as I couldn’t do the kind of activities I do now back home.
    3. What is your favorite animal care story?
    Favourite animal story would have to be the seeing wild elephants while travelling in a volunteer group in Africa, scary part was we were charged, luckily there was a large river between us.
    4. What do you wish others knew about Calgary Wildlife?
    CWRS is a great facility with passionate people working there to help give injured wildlife a second chance and is a good way for people to learn about the kinds of wildlife they may find in their area.
    5. What is your favorite way to connect with nature and enjoy local wildlife?
    My favourite why to connect with wildlife is to normally go down to Inglewood bird sanctuary and or hike in the national parks to see what is around.
    6. What is your favorite native animal?
    My favourite animal would have to be the grey wolf or any form of animal that are apex predators.
    .

  • Did you know?

    American badgers are solitary animals that are classified as a sensitive species in Alberta. While badgers do not truly hibernate, they do conserve energy in the winter by cycling through states of torpor in which their metabolism and physical activity decrease. Breeding occurs in August, but the fetus does not implant until December – February, remaining dormant until then. Young are born in early April, eyes closed and furless. Badgers are threatened due to habitat fragmentation, loss of prey species, and due to being trapped, shot and poisoned by humans.

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